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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 188 (some duplicates have been removed)
inaugural balls can do, recognizing the work of the people that have worked to get the president elected. in the 1840s, when andrew jackson was the president, he opened up the white house, much to his chagrin, because it was trashed because of that, but he wanted popular people type of event, not a formal ball. >> you can watch the president inauguration at the white house, and monday, the public ceremony , but first his weekly radio address, where he talked about recent proposals for reducing gun violence he asked the american people to find out where their representatives stood. >> hi, everybody. i announced a series of concrete steps we should take to protect our children and community from gun violence, growing out of meetings held with more than 200 different groups, from parents and teachers, to law enforcement and sportsman, to religious leaders and mental health professionals. in the weeks ahead, i will do everything in my power to make them a reality. while we might not be able to protect every act of senseless violence, if there's anything we can do to reduce it it, if one life
freed by the algerian security forces talk about their ordeal. ahead of crucial elections, chancellor merkel puts her full weight behind david mcalister and head-to-head in a nine-goal thriller. reports are coming in that algerian special forces have found 15 burned bodies in the gas plant at the southeast of the country that came under attack by muslim militants. a launch raid was held to free them and they said it prevented a massacre but 30 are still unaccounted for and 12 are unaccounted for and those who escaped have been traumatized. >> hostages celebrating their release. one described the moment the drama began. >> their goal was foreign hostages. they met a bus at the entrance of the base's living quarters. they released a few of us and killed foreigners and algerian forces on the spot then returned to the base and took hostages. >> many died or were hurt when algerian military stormed the area. it's kept officials on edge. >> i spoke with the algerian prime minister again to get an update on this very difficult situation and to underscore, again, that the utmost care must be
democratic elections to take place in the north african country in 1991. when the islamic salvation front won the first round, the government called off the voting and cracked down on islamists, forcing many underground. including a notorious terrorist leader with ties to al qaeda. he is reportedly behind this week's attack on the remote desert gas plant. though he first made a name for himself with a string of violent attacks and dramatic kidnappings after he joined an extremist group in the late 1990's. the terror has continued to this day, but the extremists seemed to be losing support. for many algerians, even an authoritarian regime is preferable to an islamist state. algeria is rich in resources, especially gas and oil. and it has hardly any public debt, but average algerians see little benefit from the country's richest. although there is great dissatisfaction from the government, it has not helped the islamists' cause. there's too much fear the country could once again descend into civil war. >> france is reporting some initial successes in mali where government troops had recaptured
a landslide victory in the country's first democratic election. but one year later, military forces carried out a coup on the grounds they were protecting the republican system. >> translator: algerian history has a precedent for terrorist tactics, leading to victory. in the case of the war of independence against france. so in a sense, there's a kind of justification for terrorism, and at the same time, there's the idea of never surrendering in the face of terrorism coming from the enemy. >> reporter: the civil war claimed the lives of 200,000 people. it involved indiscriminate bombings and widespread human rights violations. president abdelaziz bouteflika was elected for the first time in 1999. he was re-elected in 2004 and 2009. bouteflika chose to deal with militant groups in two ways. he invited them to lay down their weapons to participate in rebuilding the nation. and at the same time, he continued cracking down on their activities. observers say this approach has gained broad support amongst public. >> translator: the government was afraid that negotiating with the kidnappers and ma
. we just spent $3 billion on a presidential election and the president's appointees, most of them he makes now are most likely never to get confirmed, unlikely to get debated, certainly unlikely to get discussed and certainly unlikely to serve. >> you want to end the filibuster. what's behind that? >> senator jeff morgan would make it essential that people talk. this is what the american people want. it would encourage debate, it wouldn't push it away. >> what is your reform asking for, demanding next tuesday? >> four things. one, that the majority leader of the senate can put a bill on the floor for discussion and debate. right now he can't do that unless he has 60 votes to do that. he can't even proceed. >> number two. >> number two, nominations. the president makes nominations. there needs to be a clear way for those nominations to get discussed in a short period of time. not 30 hours of senate time, which is more than a week. but in a short period of time, they get discussed and they get a vote on nominations. number three, a conference committee. the house passes one bill. the s
illegals, i want to protect legal immigration. >> they have a big problem in national elections. >> president obama has won the election. >> the president right now has a higher approval rating certainly than congress. >> horrible numbers for congress. >> a pitiful 14%. >> pretty bad numbers on john boehner's report card. >> the debt ceiling is a dangerous game. >> i don't see that as a winner for them. >> don't fight battles you can't win. >> it is a troubled time for the party. >> let's stop for a second. >> let's make clear decisions. >> the republican strategy. >> stop talking about rape. >> don't fight battles you can't win. >> it is a troubled time for the party, get something done. >> we have to be the party of new solutions, we're not just going to be the party of no. >> it is groundhog day. >> the conservatives, the retreat, we've come a long way since. >> i'm ezra klein in for lawrence o'donnell, one of the great moments, when redford having just won the election, sits down on the bed taking it all in. the next few words are not just to ever film junky, pretty much to
as president. that's a hair above the 51% that put him back in office in the november election. 61% say he's easy-going and likable. 55% say he can handle a crisis. 51% say he's a good commander in chief. while only 29% say that he works effectively with congress. we'll be right back. >>> welcome back to "hardball." one of president obama's first major challenges in his second term will be trying to get significant new gun control legislation through the congress, but can he do it? if the outrageous opposition coming from the right is any indication, the president has a major fight on his hands. the nra has labeled him an elitist hypocrite and called out his daughters who receive secret service protection. yesterday senator ted cruz accused the president of exploiting the murder of children to push through gun control legislation, and then there are the real nuts out there. a movement of people who say that the sandy hook tragedy was a hoax. the real purpose was to create a political environment to take away all our guns. the american public is largely on board with at least some of the pr
approval rating in a while. this is the natural ebb and flow. it usually builds up after winning re-election. there are a lot of things in the agenda space. you pay off a limited budget right? you can purchase things with that political capital. the horror of newtown is such that it has forced this issue to the foreti particularly in the wake of aurora. if you were designing the agenda in the absence of that and obviously you can't do that is this something that you want to see prioritized or are there other things you would put ahead of it? >> no. this is something that needs to be prioritized. of course the whole issue of sequestration and raising the debt ceiling limit, getting the budget under control, are probably our highest priority at this point in time. we should be meeting four and five days a week in committee doing the job that we were elected to do and the republican leadership has not set a schedule that we can do that. the whole gun control issue has been on the front pages now for decades and the democrats, republicans, none of us have really done anything about it. so i thin
that we learn about harvey milk. when he was first elected, he understood the significance of his election. i would like to share with you a part of what he said. it goes, the hope speech often talk about. this is what he said to use his own words: "two days after i was elected i got a phone call and the voice was quite young. it was from al tuna, pennsylvania. the person said things. you have to elected a people so that young child and thousands of people know that there is hope for a better tomorrow." without hope, gays, blacks, seniors, the "ss" give up. without hope life is not worth living. harvey closed, and you and you and you. you have to give them hope. as i think about this, i really think that that is what we are talking about. in this measure. we are talking about giving hope to so many people who live in parts of this country, parts of the world where they cannot fathom being true to who they are; they cannot fathom being honest to themselves let alone other people about their sexual orientation. something that struck me about what was said in the last couple of days was som
. and germany's ruling party tries to hold onto power in a key regional election. >> do i have remorse? absolutely. >> lance armstrong apologizes, but can he rebuilt his tarnished reputation? >>> the algerian hostage crisis is over. special forces stormed the remote gas plant, killing 11 gunmen after they took the lives of 74 hostages. -- took the lives of 7 4 hostages. dozens of people are still unaccounted for. at 29 gunmen said to have links with al qaeda are thought to have been killed. >> the first photo to emerge out of what happened shows hostages kneeling captive in the desert. in other pictures broadcast by algerian tv, they are shown group against a wall. we don't know how many of these people survived what was to come. army helicopter swooped over the complex as they were cornered by algerian special forces. the hopes of a clinical rescue operation and release of hostages have been dashed, state media reporting that seven hostages and 11 militants were killed in the final assault. workers from britain, the u.s., japan, and norway are still among those unaccounted for. in nor
is already a lame duck. he's gun his second election. we've already talked about people will succeed him. by his own calculation he's got 16 months to make it his mark. he has to come out of the box, fast and energetic. he's coming out on guns, immigration, fiscal policy. he needs to push the other side defering to his judgment while he has the opportunity to do it. >> if you agree, chuck that he has left radge that he may never have again, let's just talk about the gun part of this. does he have the leverage to get all of these plans he came up with, far more specific thing than people suspected through this congress. >> because of the tragedy in connecticut this was an issue that suddenly had to be pushed through front burner unlike things like fiscal policy and immigration. and i think the answer to your question is we'll have to wait and see but there's a lot of doubters including in congress with the big things like the assault weapons ban. it's lost probably so much support that that probably won't happen. he might be able to get the university background check. that seems fairly f
is this is a real imperative. what's new, it also is now an imperative for republicans. the election results from last november made clear the republican party needs a message for latino, asian-americans and immigrant groups if they have any chance of recapturing the white house. >> scott, this is carla marinucci. what's your thoughts on this? we've seen paul ryan, marco rubio extend a hand to president obama so to speak and suggest they are ready to talk about immigration reform. what's the biggest hurdle here? >> well, i think the biggest hurdle in the end is going to be politics, of course, but the issue of citizenship. what marco rubio outlined this week and last weekend is very close to what president obama talked about in 2011. and so i think that will provide some cover for other republicans. when you've got someone like marco rubio, a rising star in the party, paul ryan, saying we're ready to do a deal here, but the devil is in the details as they always say. democrats feel very emboldened on this issue, and they're going to sort of, you know, swing for the fences. they want full legal st
, the white house held a reception for newly elected members of the congress, only 27 of the new republican house members showed up. that's out of a record freshman class that totaled 87. more recently no elected republicans elected a white house screening of "lincoln" last month. had mitch mcconnell, john boehner, lamar alexander attended, they were all invited, they would have joined not only nancy pelosi, harry reid but steven spielberg, tommy lee jones. as tip o'neill famously said about his political foe, ronald reagan, love the sinner. hate the sin. when president reagan would invite the speaker, tip o'neill over to the white house for drinks and raise a glass to one another. there's no shortage of parties planned around inauguration 2013. here is hoping it spills over to the next four years and both sides of the aisle make a move to be more social and more civil. and, hence, more productive. that's "hardball" for now. thanks for being with us. "the ed show" with ed schultz, starts right now. >>> good evening, americans. welcome "the ed show" from new york. republicans are raising the
, democrats running for re-election and most of them come from midwestern, western states. they have strong, rural communities and therefore are a lot more open to maintaining gun rights and so you will have a lot of these democrats who will be very nervous voting for any big changes and harry reid is one of them. the national rifle association stayed out of the reelection race and he owes it to them to perhaps temper the debate and not necessarily let all of this go through. >> that's one reason why you're seeing the president take executive action and that's something you heard critics and people who had been his supporters criticized him for not doing more of that in his first term and he's signaling that he's willing to do more of that on these big fights and it's about seizing the moment because the further and further you get from the sandy hook tragedy, the less you're likely to achieve and he's trying to make this happen swiftly. >> let's talk about second terms. how have presidents comparatively, how have they feared in his second term. that's when the big scandal happens. the iran
said on national television the night -- election night of 2000 as florida was coming in that the election would be decided that night. people may remember that election was decided by the supreme court. it went on for two or three months. it ended up being decided by the governors, bush's brother, a supreme court judge chosen by his father. >>> george bush was asked if he had ever been wrong and said he could not think of a time. he is still saying that. [laughter] humble man. we are about out of time. do you have a short question? >> what is the circulation of "the nation"? >> 1.5 million readers online and 160,000 paper circulation. paul newman was a great and loyal friend and supporter. his partner in crime, robert redford, has been a supporter. we have a circle of 100 people who give each year. 30,000 associates give little each month above the subscription price in the belief it is not just a media institution but a community. there are 40 discussion groups around the country. [applause] >> these people obviously support it for what it espouses and believes in. d
in pejorative terms but i do take pride this the work that this office does along side our other elected officials and community partners especially at this time of year to bring some financial relief to folks that are strugglings that is rewarding and that is why we are in this business and this is why we have other elect elected officials in this for all the trucestic reasonses do good and make a difference in people's lives and this is irrespective of when you accomplish it but, i'll say that it's an added sweetener as it were to top announced in the holiday time when we know there are folks that are struggling and blink a little bit of relief to them and on the path to financial stability that is a rewarding thing. thank you very much.director rubke? >> present. >> mr. chairman, directors you do have a quorum. >>> thank you. working with all of these microphones to try to get them on. item 3 announcement of prohibition of sound producing devices during the meeting. please be advises that these sound producing electronic devices are prohibited at the meeting and any person responsi
election-year in austria, meaning that voters will go to the polls several times. regional parliaments are due to be elected in four of the country's states this spring, followed by the national election of the federal parliament this autumn. it will not be an easy campaign for the traditional parties. they face competition from a political newcomer. some austrian politicians are reminded of a time in the early 1990's when a man came from the far right and meddled with the traditional austrian political landscape. he died four years ago, and his party has since lost some of its significance, but some former supporters have now found a new political home with a new party. >> he who has the gold makes the rules -- that was the model used when introducing the party in the timber. he was born into a poor family in austria but went to canada to make his millions. now he has returned to make a dramatic entrance on the political scene. >> i am certain that this is a very important day that will go down in austrian history. i also think it will go down in the history of the world. >> the recen
, the question is what urgency to do they place on that. we had an election two months ago where there were two candidates, one was more focused on cutting the deficit and reducing our long term debt and one didn't think it was a big concern. the one who didn't think it was a big concern won the election. yes, voters seem to say that is an issue they agree with, but when it came to election day two months ago that certainly wasn't one of the top issues they voted on because they voted for the candidate who wasn't embody go it. >> heather: through his actions, as well. that leads to this, how f or if it should be raised? should the debt limit be raised again, 23% say yes, but 69% don't agree with the president. they say raise it only after major cuts. there again what cuts would those be but president obama as we know he increased the debt by $6 trillion in his if you are four years. some say that administration overspent by one trillion a year every year since he's been in office. now she demanding the get ceiling to be increased again. do you think he will be listen to the 69% that say only af
-controlled house. initially elected with an outsidef of the beltway appeal, the president is now by definition a washington insider and for anything to get done in his second term, he is going to have to play an insider's game. joining me now is one of the most important allies that the president has on the hill. since 1993, he has represented the sixth district of south carolina in the house of representatives where he is now the third highest ranking democrat. congressman james clyburn. it is so lovely to have you here. >> thank you so much for having me. >> i want to talk to you about guns and immigration, but before i get there, i want to talk to you about what happened with the republicans in the house who seem to have done a little mini cave on the debt ceiling, and it looks like they are going to be willing to extend the debt ceiling for three months with which is the cover of the new york times this morning, and what is that about? what is happening? >> well, it seems they are trying to line up their opposition to the president, this debt ceiling trying to line it up with two other big
of the election year, yet you don't have presidential candidates to have a vastly different approach to it. >> it is true that i think it is the increasingly become an issue, and the heartland of america, especially in the south. for instance in north carolina, there's been a huge increase in the latino population of north carolina, but most people don't understand how those latinos got there. it is a largely guatemalan migration, and its large the people who were recruited in the 1980's and 1990's to come and work in the textile mills of north carolina, because part of what i try to show in the book is the enormous connection between the needs of capital of american expanding industries in the u.s. and this recruitment of labor. what happened basically is in the 1980's, more salvadorans and guatemalans were flocking to the united states as a result of the civil wars and their country and repression in their country. they came here to the u.s. and there were industries that were needed for cheap labor. you have the meat packing industry in the midwest that began recruiting many mexicans to
and matters, item 3, election of officers according with the rules and regulation his the president and vice president shall be elected at the first regular meeting of the commission held on or after the 15th day of january of each year or to a subsequent meeting. the date, which shall be fixed by the commission at the first regular>)( b5d meeting on or after the 15th day of january each year. pngetsz commissioner antonini. >> commissioner antonini: i would like to nominate rodney fong for president and cindy wu for vice president. >> second. >> there is no discussion. shall i call the roll? on the motion to -- >> president fong: public comment? >> it is an agendized item. you may. >> president fong: is there public comment on item 3(b) election of officers? seeing none... >> on the motion to elect the commissioner fong as president commissioner wu as vice president commission yeabt, aye, bore don, aye. >> hill list, aye, moore aye, wu aye. >> so moved. that motion passed unanimously and congratulations to presid
in the book about this a little. if senator kennedy had been alive, he was so critical to the election of president obama. his endorsement in the pivotal period with the turbulence in turmoil early after south carolina, i think he would have been important inside the system as a push towards something bigger and would have pushed to have more connection to outside the beltway. obama it is now traveling on the country. he is forced to because of the election. if you sit inside the beltway too long and get in the backroom deals -- >> even movements can be cloistered. i remember a dinner during the george w. bush administration in southern california. it was norman lear and his wife, larry david, bob scheer. they were sitting around w eeping in their expensive soup about the fact that we were living in hell. rupert murdoch on the media. george bush was president. norman lear had his pulse on american culture for 30 years. why cannot figure out how to deal -- deliver a message that is important and happening? >> that is important. we can find messages that speak to people where they are. t
election and maybe more so this time, to put tens of millions of dollars on behalf of gun control against candidates, couldn't this challenge the national rifle association, its influence? >> it's ironic that bloom berg is doing that. when you compare new york city to chicago, which is headed for a record number of homicides, new york city recorded the lowest homicides since 1960 ace, that's effective policing by the new york police department. and if michael bloomberg would put more into policing, chicago, st. louis, it would be better spent. >> paul: it's a challenge for the nra political clout. we'll see who wins. >> as president obama prepares to be sworn for for his second term, what is he hoping to accomplish? we know that guns are on the agenda, but from immigration to debt reduction is compromise the name of his game or taking back the house in 2014 his real priority. >> they have a particular vision about what government should and should not do. so they're suspicious about government's commitments, for example, to make sure that seniors have decent health care as they get older
now. with the latest results of the national elections we've been saying it more strenuously and more strongly. the bulk of the republican party seems not to be listening, as you just pointed out. they call it a communications problem or they call it a -- we're just not getting the really hard core message of the republican party across. i'm afraid they are getting that message across. and that message is tinged with intolerance for women, minorities, lgbt community and for others who don't, you know, measure up to the mitt romney image of the other percent, the 47% that doesn't count is what republicans simply don't appeal to. >> are they on their way to being a regional party? >> i think they're on their way to committing suicide, very frankly. this has happened before in our history where an existing party has either morphed into another or died and this might just be happening again. if they don't adjust the way they're looking at the rest of this country, if they don't adjust some of their very platform principles, they're done. they're finished. we can put a fork in them. they'r
through they wonder why they bothered to get re-elected but i think president obama is in a position to put pressure on the congress because of the nature in which he won. he demonstrated there is now at the presidential level a pretty reliable consistent majority coalition that democrats have. and there's incentive for republicans to try to shake up this electoral alignment. and i think that gives him some leverage on several issues. guns to some extent. immigration even more so. >> and certainly we've seen a change in the president in the last few weeks. is this something that we can expect in the second term, do you think, overall, a more aggressive president obama? >> i think clearly. look what happened here. again, i go back to the election. democrats have often been con strained on some of these issues. guns is a perfect issue. we went over a decade where democrats didn't talk about the issue, largely by the fear of losing conservative white voters, blue collar voters, older voters. the president lost all those voters. he did badly with all of them and still won and he won 332
of elected throughout the state and community leaders as well and we are hopeful that this will be a template for what wedo in this case and that we get a similar level of success to make sure had a money goes back to the people who are victim iressed and that they get the restitution that they deserve and i would like to introduce michael papist from the enter face-to-face 98 counsel because he was a big part in making sure we got our effort out to the 98 community and to make sure that borrowers who were vimsed got the restitution they deserved and we are happy he is cooperating in our effort for the next 90 days. >> p oop pennsylvania a s.-the san francisco enter fate counsel is absolutely indebted if you will forgive the pun to his city treasure her heira in this suspicious when this program started. we believe that the victims of predatory lending are sill the in in our pews and we work with faith-based organization to provide the safety yet and net and we are here today to commit ourselves again to the good work that dennis is doing and in the past, we have used our technology networ
. it was relatively easy it was unanimous that george washington had been elected president. the first thing they had to do was notify washington he needed to come to take his oath of office. it took a little while for presidents of the united states in those days to get to wherever the federal government was so they had a couple of weeks to work things out. well the first thing they did was to write an oath for everybody else to take including the vice president of the united states. congress write it is oath that every other person who works for the government from military to judges to the legislators. that is an oath written by congress and it's changed over the centuries. but the oath the president takes is unique. it's in the constitution and it's never changed. so the question was where are we going to swear in the president of the united states? well congress is meeting in federal hall on wall street. and it was a nice building. the house had the bigger room downstairs and the senate had the smaller room upstairs. and they said the president should be sworn in in our chamber. that was fine ex
bush, the elder took over. she was there in 1985, president reagan's re-election. she was there in 1981, the first reagan inaugural. that's andrea mitchell. if i end up doing these for as long as andrea mitchell has done these, i will be covering every inauguration from now until 2041, by which time i will be coming to you, presumably, as a ho hologram. so help me god. second inaugural, as opposed to a first inaugural when one president is leaving and another is starting, and we're covering a second inauguration, like we will be this year there's something different. governing is already under way. the president has started some things that he intends to finish in his second term. sort of a sense of continuity, well informed expectation about what kind of president this is going to be and where he is likely to go. when president obama was inaugurated. first time, there was none of that certainty and expectation, right? the country and all of us were caught up in the historical enormity of the fact that the united states of america was about to swear in our first african-american preside
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 188 (some duplicates have been removed)